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Jonathan Kizer

Jonathan Kizer is a freelance writer that has been featured across the web. His experience is wide-ranging, having used almost every mobile and desktop OS for at least some time. His area of expertise is in anything Apple or Google. He also considers a biography page as an excellent way to make people laugh, but can't currently think of a suitable joke.

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2013 was a massive year for the iPad, both in terms of new hardware and in terms of software. iOS 7 basically wiped the app slate clean, creating a void that thousands of developers all tried to fill. New hardware opened up new options for most developers to exploit with the latest apps. Without further ado, here are my twenty-five favorite apps for the past year. (more…)

Dictionary! That likely isn’t the first type of app you rush to the App Store to install when you open up your new iPad. However, a handy, powerful dictionary can come in handy in almost all professions, and the iPad is the thinnest dictionary you’re likely to find.

The problem is, most dictionary apps are complete garage. They either rely on a constant internet connection (deal breaker for many), or have a poor layout that makes finding words and other information about each word cumbersome. WordBook tries to buck this trend by being optimized for iOS 7, and placing an emphasis on your information, instead of advertisements to pay for the service. (more…)

The fear of losing simple arithmetic capabilities over time is something that I’ve experienced. Many of us begin to lose the ability to quickly and correctly process relatively simple math problems after we graduate from school and get into the groove of regular jobs, some of which don’t actually require much math — or if they do, there’s always a calculator at the ready.

Quick Math+ is a game, yes, but it also tries to sharpen those skills to a fine point with time tracking functionality and various modes that focus on memory retention as well as the ability to process multiplication, division, subtraction, and addition problems. (more…)

Weather apps on the iPad have always been an interesting area. Apple has never shipped a stock weather app, so developers and designers haven’t had a starting point to build from as they have on iOS. Many developers have used this to creatively construct an interface that excels in showing information while still being attractive. Others have used this as an excuse to just blow up their iPhone version and call it good.

Yahoo! Weather — henceforth known as simply Yahoo Weather, without the exclamation point — is one of the more recent entrants to the weather category. Featuring a strong backend database and a unique interface that is loaded with data, is it enough to become the best weather app for the iPad? (more…)

Calculators on computers tend to follow one of two paths. Some are simply digital recreations of the physical object. Their number pad is made of pixels instead of plastic, and they generally are poorly made to handle anything more than a simple arithmetic operation.

The second line of calculation app can be seen in spreadsheets, which rely on the keyboard much more heavily and are also capable of significantly more advanced operations. The iPad hasn’t seen many great, pure calculation apps. Tydlig — funny name, yes — tries to prove that math can be as intuitive as Apple’s iPad. (more…)

With the New Year coming, workout regiments will see a massive increase in popularity as people around the world promise themselves that they will get in shape.

An app can’t do that hard work for you, but it can try to make the process as simple as possible. 7 Minute Workout aims to do just this. (more…)

Email clients are chief among the list of essential apps. While the protocol itself is as old as time — at least in technology — it is also one of the most reliable and omniscient ways to communicate. Corporations use it to notify us of sales and updates, friends use it to send along the funny photo of the day.

Most email apps strive to be adequate. With the surplus of different providers and standards, it’s hard for any single app to excel unless it focuses on doing one thing right. Boxer tries to combine some of the best aspects of other apps, and then bring it to the various different email providers in one app. (more…)

iOS 7 was the largest upgrade to iOS ever. It brought along a completely new design language on both the iPhone and iPad, and unlocked various APIs that have made applications more useful and powerful. It also introduced new technologies and APIs, such as iBeacon, that should become only more useful as time goes on.

In terms of usability, however, it offered no major advances for the iPad. In a world where tablets are increasingly being used in lieu of laptops, iOS on the iPad needs to mature, and fast. (more…)

If an iPad is Apple’s post-PC platform of choice, it will have to be capable of completing tasks of every type. Certain activities, such as photo and video manipulation, are well-suited to the iPad’s fluid UI and direct interaction methods.

Other areas are something of a different story. For example, there is still no outstanding way to manipulate, organize, and share numerical data. The simplistic extreme of this is something like Calcbot, which makes it easy to do rather trivial mathematical operations, and then copy those to the clipboard to share via iOS’ built-in copy/paste functionality.

Calca is a step beyond this, but not quite a dedicated spreadsheet program: it leaves out most of the organization features. Instead, Calca focuses on the manipulation and sharing of data. (more…)

Grid represents some of the latest ideas in the iOS creativity space: gone are the antiquated menu commands found in Microsoft Office, replaced by a focus on a clean interface, collaboration, performance, and gestures. Just how far does Grid go? Is Grid the future of spreadsheets and data organization, or is it just a glorified scrapbooking application for iOS? Read on! (more…)

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