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App.net developers have produced a wide variety of applications, ranging from simple ports of Twitter apps to innovative apps that support App.net’s file storage API. Apps that support the service’s basic user timeline are plentiful, but the spotlight has shifted to the apps that ditch conventional design and support App.net’s new and innovative features. Chimp is one of the newest App.net clients that does just this. Today we’ll put the app under the microscope to see just how well it stands up to the competition.
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Don’t you often discuss articles or quotes you read with friends, family and colleagues? Wouldn’t it be great if you could share what you read with them directly from your iPad?

Thanks to Quote.FM, you can post interesting quotes and articles for followers and others to browse, comment and like. You can also see what others are sharing, discover new citations and even meet new people based on topics you like and discuss together.
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Flipboard exemplifies the modern, successful application. Since its release, it has outwitted some of the most successful magazine and news organizations of the century. Many attribute its success to the innovative interface, which combines elements found in high-profile magazines with the fluidity of modern digital design, but others find the very idea behind the app to be the most intriguing aspect. The premise of Flipboard is obvious: in an age when opening a Twitter client also downloads a deluge of updates and information, Flipboard automatically sifts through the rubble and reveals only the truly great content hiding in the mundane updates that populate modern social networks. (more…)

Twitter applications aren’t the most difficult ones to find on the App Store, but most people either stick to the official application or popular ones, such as Tweetbot or Twitterrific. There are, however, a certain number of alternative apps that can suit some people better. Examples include clients like Osfoora HD and Echofon, but also TweetCaster, a full-featured iOS Twitter application few people know about.

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At $4.99, Articles is by far the most expensive Wikipedia option in the App Store. I approached it with a little bit of trepidation and a lot of doubt, wondering why on earth I would want to spend that kind of money on what’s basically a Wikipedia app. Up until this point, like many people I’m sure, I was using Wikipanion for my Wikipedia needs, which is great but I think that Articles is way better.

Articles is more or less a special interface for Wikipedia articles. The interface espouses a different philosophy than its competition. Articles is meant for long-form reading and learning, and it feels to me like the Instapaper or Pocket of Wikipedia. I’ve been looking for an app like this – one that treats Wikipedia like a real encyclopedia that should be read and enjoyed. And this app more than does the trick.

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Browser bookmarks have long served as a way to keep track of useful sites. Many browsers allow bookmark syncing, but users who switch browsers may lose bookmarks amidst the shuffling. Apps like Instapaper offer archiving for blog posts and articles, but they simply aren’t meant for general bookmarking. Evernote can store HTML copies of websites, but this solution is clumsy, and large collections of bookmarks make the app unwieldy.

Pinboard is a simple bookmarking service that allows users to bookmark webpages and funnel in bookmarks from many other services and browsers. Pinboard is similar to Delicious, except significantly faster and less social. Bookmarks are stored in the cloud, so users can access them anywhere. The service features tag support and a read later queue, and bookmarks can be labelled as public or private. The service is available for a one-time fee, which currently sits around $10. The fee grows with each purchase, which serves as a way to prevent unsustainable growth.

Although Pinboard is an excellent service, there’s a lack of solid Pinboard applications in the App Store. The service has a mobile version, but it’s missing many of the perks that native apps take advantage of. Collin Donnell’s Pinbook is a universal Pinboard client that attempts to bring the best aspects of Pinboard to the iPhone and iPad.

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Everything that we do nowadays is somehow connected to our social networks: we get new content from Twitter, we share things on Facebook, we reblog things from Tumblr; so why not just make our iPad web browsing experience a social network in itself?

That’s where Webnote comes in. It’s a brand new iPad app that parts from the concept that everything that we do around the web is social nowadays, so why not make your browsing experience sharing-enabled? Interesting, right? Let’s check it out!
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Apple’s dominant iPad platform does not have a shortage of web browsers. From Apple’s own excellent Safari to Google’s rising Chrome, the iPad enjoys quality web browsers that compete with each other for the use of consumers. While the previous two browsers are certainly among the more popular, there are other applications that compete in other ways. The Puffin Web Browser is on the forefront of these browsers, offering various features not found on any of the more popular choices.

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In the past half a decade, there has been a tremendous shift in the way news is delivered to us. Twitter, as an Internet model, revolutionized the way we access information from all our favourite news sources. But there is still one huge problem with an Internet-based news model: There are too many news sources out there.

Enter the newest news delivery method: curation. Unlike an aggregator (like the Huffington Post or RSS feed, for example), news curators aren’t simply fetching articles from their favourite websites and posting them in one place. They hand-pick articles and deliver what they deem to be the most important news of the day into hand-picked packages of content.

Dave Pell is a news curator (or, as he pitches himself, a human algorithm). His universal app (and email newsletter) is called NextDraft. And his work is brilliant. (more…)

App.net is rapidly evolving from an ambitious concept into a flourishing reality. User registrations have exceeded the 25,000 mark, and the addition of Netbot, by Tapbots, to the App.net lineup lead to a boom in new user registrations.

AppNet Rhino was the first App.net iOS client to make it into the hands of users, but its lack of features resulted in a less-than-stellar experience. It’s hard to scoff at a free application, but App.net users are a technologically savvy bunch, and other free apps were trumping Rhino in both style and functionality. The AppNet Rhino team acknowledged this feature gap with an impressive update, which also made Rhino one of two App.net iPad clients currently available. Let’s take a look at this new iPad version, and examine just how well it holds up against the Tapbots juggernaut. (more…)

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