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I read a statistic once that said that WordPress powers over 22% of all new websites, worldwide. Wow. That’s a staggering amount of data, and yet the platform that many bloggers know and love is still going strong after years in the business. I’ve been using it on my personal site for years, and we use it here at AppStorm, too. It’s about as solid as you can get.

Problem is, the WordPress app for the iPad has historically not been very good, turning off quite a few users. But now, we have Poster, an app that promises to make the process of writing and publishing blog posts to your WordPress site much easier. Does it hold up, or is it just another flash in the pan? Let’s discover together. (more…)

This won’t be the first time I geek out over Wikipedia or a related app. I’m a huge advocate for the repository of all human knowledge (I will go toe-to-toe with any high school teacher over the veracity of Wikipedia as a source), as both an academic utility and a great way for those of us who learn for fun to expand our knowledge. Wikipedia is a vast and powerful outlet of information, and lately it has been really exciting to see how app developers come up with new ways to navigate and grasp that information.

Today we’re going to take a look at Wikiweb, an iOS application from Friends of The Web whose unique approach to Wikipedia aims to help you visualize the relationships between various topics and pages. Grab some coffee, sit back with your iPad and get ready to learn something new after the jump. (more…)

When I first purchased my new iPad, I hoped that it would finally drop the bane of having to carry my laptop around with me on long trips just so I could do a bit of writing, and although there is a great choice of writing apps available for the iPad, I found it difficult to find one that would allow me to post directly to my blog. Then Posts came along, and how I blogged on my iPad was changed forever. (more…)

If you’re a male, chances are pretty good that you’ve heard of Pinterest, the social network where you “pin” items to a virtual wall, but there’s a chance you haven’t used it much yet — but your girlfriend or wife definitely has. That’s because Pinterest is the hottest social network going right now, particularly among women — some estimates put the percentage of female users close to 70%.

As a man myself, I do see the value of Pinterest, and even though I don’t use it as much as my female friends, it’s still a place I go to check out what’s new and cool. Up until Wednesday, there was only a Pinterest client for the iPhone, and it’s pretty neat. But now there’s an iPad version of Pinterest. How does it match up? Let’s find out.  (more…)

Google Chrome is one of the most popular browsers out there and probably the app of choice for quite a few of our readers. It came as somewhat of a surprise when Chrome for iOS was announced on day two of Google I/O, in between demonstrations of extreme sports.

Taking on Safari in it’s own territory is a bold move from Google, although it signifies the company’s commitment to other platforms than it’s own and will likely put a smile on some die-hard Chrome users’ faces. In this review, we’re going to take Chrome for iPad out for a spin and provide some thoughts on how it stacks up to the native Safari. (more…)

Recently, I’ve been spending quite some time with my iPad in a web design context for a few articles over at Tuts+, and had the chance to use some fantastic iPad apps that are disrupting one of the core stereotypes of the iPad, its uselessness for content creation. I’ve came to the conclusion that the iPad is the perfect device for planning projects like web design, acting as a great canvas for producing and sharing plans, prototypes and ideas.

Adobe Proto is an app that’s leading the way to disrupting this meme of a tablet not being fit for productivity. The app is all about planning and prototyping ideas in wireframes consisting of a number of stock elements and even adhering to popular CSS grid systems.

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If you’re a Mac OS X user and involved in the web design/development scene, you’ve probably heard of the indie developers Panic and, more specifically, their product Coda. Coda is an all-in-one web development enviroment that pulls together multiple tools such as visual CSS generation, file transfer and reference together with a text editor supporting a range of languages. Last month, Panic released Coda 2, a signifcantly updated version of the software.

Alongside the release of Coda 2, Panic also released Diet Coda, an accompanying $19.99 app for iPad that’s already disrupting the long-term stereotype of an iPad being useless for productivity. Diet Coda combines a text editor with a powerful FTP-based file manager making editing your files stored online a pleasant and productive experience. Let’s take a look…

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The range of Twitter clients out there on the App Store is pretty extensive (for a comparison between some of the most common ones, check out my roundup from last October) and picking between them is quite difficult seeing as each one offers a different range of features, interfaces and customisation possibilities.

My favourite one (and the one I’m using at the moment) is Tweetbot as it offers such great variety in terms of features (including iCloud sync with my iPhone, which is an absolute lifesaver) and its generally simplistic yet powerful functionality. But now, in such a saturated market, there’s a new kid on the block.

Quip, which was released on May 31st by developers Glasshouse Apps (who are also the creators of The Early Edition, one of my favourite iPad news readers) is a new kind of Twitter client which focuses on your conversations and condenses your timeline down into a more manageable format.

I was lucky enough to snag a promotional code for Quip so let’s dive straight in and see whether it can knock Tweetbot off that top spot.

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In 2008 Apple opened the iOS gates to third-party developers, but its strict App Store policies severely limited app creativity. App Store submissions were rejected if the app duplicated core functionality of iOS native apps. This meant that the quality of the web browsing and emailing experience was solely controlled by Apple. Web browsers were some of the first applications to slide past Apple’s restrictive policies, and several excellent notables clawed their way above the rest.

Phillip reviewed Grazing a few months ago, and reading the review left me hungry to try it. Unfortunately, I found myself less concerned with flexibility of browsing and sharing and more concerned with download management, something that both Mobile Safari and Grazing lack. This led me to iCab Mobile, a powerful browser by Alexander Clauss.

How does iCab hold up to the competition? Can it counter Mobile Safari’s native advantage?

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You love scouring the web for reading material, but you just can’t find the time to read everything on the spot. Perhaps you’ve already run into popular “read later” apps such as Instapaper, Readability, and Safari’s own “Reader” feature.

One could certainly be perfectly satisfied with what those apps have to offer, but just how much would you be missing out on if you pass on Pocket (formerly Read It Later)?

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