As an fan of Apple, I’m sometimes bestowed the label of “fanboy” by some individuals. I often find these incidents to be humorous, as most of the individuals bestowing me the title could in fact be labeled fanboys as well — but for another tech company. I have zero qualms being called an Apple fanboy, as I’m proud to support a company that creates stellar software and hardware. Likewise, I’ve often touted my love for Pocket Casts over all other podcast apps, and could very well be branded a Pockets Casts fanboy.

Since my initial review of Pockets Casts for the iPhone way back in August 2011, I’ve continued to utilize it for all my podcasting needs. During that time I’d hear rumors of a iPad version in development, and eventually learned it would finally make its way with the release of Pocket Casts 4. So, when Pocket Casts 4 was initially released for Android over iOS, I was disappointed. When the new app was delayed after the announcement of iOS 7 at WWDC, I was disappointed even more so. With the arrival of iOS 7, Pockets Casts 4 has finally found its way to my iPad. The question is, was it worth the wait? (more…)

With so much focus on getting kids educated in math and technology early, it can be hard for more humanities-focused parents to know where to start. Those of us with degrees in Art History, French, and French Art History may not be the best equipped to get the younger generation ready for all that tough science-y stuff ahead.

I know I need some help, and The Human Body is just the thing. It’s a great way to learn all about the body, and while it’s definitely for the little ones, I managed to learn a thing or two, as well. (more…)

I’m a sucker for a great iPad game. I like games I can pick up and play really quickly, since my time is often short and since I’ve got a bit of a short attention span. (Coincidentally, we can probably blame the iPad itself for that.) A great game, though, needs to reward me enough to make me keep coming back. It needs to surprise me. It needs to make me serious.

These days, I’m fortunate to be living in an era where great games like that are often found on the App Store. Pivvot is one of those games that rewards me for coming back. It surprises me. It makes me jump. I feel like it exercises my brain. But at the same time, it’s also an insanely cool concept. Let me tell you what there is to love about this.


I’m always looking for a better weather app — something that gives me the best information in the most attractive interface. Weathertron is one of the slickest weather apps I’ve seen, creating personalized weather infographics every day.

While looks are always nice, what really matters in a weather app is quality of information and whether you can find what you need when you need it. I’ll take a look at Weathertron and find out if it’s more than just a pretty face. (more…)

Recently, I got myself a Pinboard account to start saving articles that were important to me for archival purchases. At about $10 a pop, it’s not too expensive and it seemed like it was an easy cross-platform way to get access to web articles that are important to me.

That being said, I really wanted to find a way to access these articles on my devices. Pinboard’s great, but the website doesn’t look fantastic on mobile devices — even iPads — and I wanted a Pinboard app with a great interface. This is why I decided to give Prickle a shot. It’s got one of the most beautiful interfaces I’ve ever seen for a Pinboard app. Read on to find out if it’s worth your hard-earned cash.


When it comes to Apple’s iconic media events, the one thing that guarantees hype is new hardware. No matter what else is on the agenda, iPhones and iPads are the star attractions. Understandably, much of the other news interspersed between device unveilings is swept aside, perhaps given a whisper of coverage after the dust settles. For me, it is those tidbits I find tantalisingly mysterious, a mere breadcrumb hinting at a grander plan. Last week’s iPhone event was no different.

Prior to WWDC I’d have forgiven anyone for thinking iWork had been put out to pasture. With no desktop update since 2009, it’s fair to say the web app versions of Pages, Keynote, and Numbers came with more than a little intrigue. In a sense, Apple had just created its first multi-platform apps. Now, four months later, Apple has dropped another breadcrumb. All three iWork iOS apps are now free for purchasers of a new iOS 7 device — Apple’s strategy is beginning to come full circle with more than a little risk and reward.


It feels like just yesterday when Evernote got a big 6.0 update. At the time, it was a pretty big hoopla. It was universally well-received. From top to bottom, 6.0 was to Evernote what iOS 7 is to the iPhone: a complete and total rethinking of how it works and how it looks. And, to be completely frank, I hated it. I thought it was slow and I thought it slowed down my process with unnecessary and ugly menus.

With the release of iOS 7, Evernote is once again getting another huge visual update. This time, Evernote’s release is version 7. Not only has it been redesigned, but the very basics of how people use the app has been rethought on both the iPhone and the iPad. And, to my surprise, I love it. Read on to find out why I plan on making Evernote a steady part of my workflow again.


You’re halfway through the September challenge of cooking supper at home 5 nights a week. You began the routine of preparing meals at home with The Photo Cookbook-Simple and Delicious, a collection of basic recipes with step-by-step photos to guide you. After building a bit of confidence you branched out with more global flavors in BBC Good Food Quick Recipes. Now you’re ready to unleash your creativity and master a few more cooking skills with Jamie Oliver’s Recipes.

This app is for people who love to cook and eat, whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned cook. Jamie’s recipes are bold, flavorful and generous. It’s not just about feeding your family; it’s about providing nourishment. Cooking with Jamie is bold, brash and fun. You’ll enjoy mounding a pile of salad leaves in that big wooden serving bowl you never use. Serving grilled meat and veg on that platter collecting dust in the china cabinet will bring your intention and focus to the table. This app helps to cement the new practice of cooking supper at home as something bigger than a routine — a ritual.

Are you ready to take home-cooked suppers to the next level? Keep reading to learn more.


We’ve been doing a series on the iPad and professionals for several weeks now, and each one has required a fair amount of prep work on my part. After all, I’m not a professional musician or artist. I like to dabble, but trying to round apps up without truly being a professional in any field requires a lot of digging. In some cases, like our post on the iPad and musicians, I ended up missing a lot of apps. Sometimes, an entire professional field is impossible to cover.

This week is a little different. Although I never expect to completely cover an entire category, I’m a little more confident writing about iPad apps for professional journalists because of the work I do in this very sector. I’ve got a degree in communications and used an iPad in my later years of university. I’m thrilled to share some knowledge in an area I feel extremely knowledgable in this week.


There are a multitude of apps and services that let you bookmark articles for reading later, just like there are plenty of apps that give you a clean, readable version of any article you give it. And don’t get me started on apps that let you share your content through a social network. Do you really need another timeline?

But how about a service that pulls all of these features together, making it much easier to clean up your articles, store them for later, annotate them and share them when you are done reading them? Yes, it exists, it’s called dotdotdot and it’s available for the iPad! Want to check it out?

Page 11 of 144« First...910111213...203040...Last »