It feels like just yesterday when Evernote got a big 6.0 update. At the time, it was a pretty big hoopla. It was universally well-received. From top to bottom, 6.0 was to Evernote what iOS 7 is to the iPhone: a complete and total rethinking of how it works and how it looks. And, to be completely frank, I hated it. I thought it was slow and I thought it slowed down my process with unnecessary and ugly menus.

With the release of iOS 7, Evernote is once again getting another huge visual update. This time, Evernote’s release is version 7. Not only has it been redesigned, but the very basics of how people use the app has been rethought on both the iPhone and the iPad. And, to my surprise, I love it. Read on to find out why I plan on making Evernote a steady part of my workflow again.

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You’re halfway through the September challenge of cooking supper at home 5 nights a week. You began the routine of preparing meals at home with The Photo Cookbook-Simple and Delicious, a collection of basic recipes with step-by-step photos to guide you. After building a bit of confidence you branched out with more global flavors in BBC Good Food Quick Recipes. Now you’re ready to unleash your creativity and master a few more cooking skills with Jamie Oliver’s Recipes.

This app is for people who love to cook and eat, whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned cook. Jamie’s recipes are bold, flavorful and generous. It’s not just about feeding your family; it’s about providing nourishment. Cooking with Jamie is bold, brash and fun. You’ll enjoy mounding a pile of salad leaves in that big wooden serving bowl you never use. Serving grilled meat and veg on that platter collecting dust in the china cabinet will bring your intention and focus to the table. This app helps to cement the new practice of cooking supper at home as something bigger than a routine — a ritual.

Are you ready to take home-cooked suppers to the next level? Keep reading to learn more.

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We’ve been doing a series on the iPad and professionals for several weeks now, and each one has required a fair amount of prep work on my part. After all, I’m not a professional musician or artist. I like to dabble, but trying to round apps up without truly being a professional in any field requires a lot of digging. In some cases, like our post on the iPad and musicians, I ended up missing a lot of apps. Sometimes, an entire professional field is impossible to cover.

This week is a little different. Although I never expect to completely cover an entire category, I’m a little more confident writing about iPad apps for professional journalists because of the work I do in this very sector. I’ve got a degree in communications and used an iPad in my later years of university. I’m thrilled to share some knowledge in an area I feel extremely knowledgable in this week.

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There are a multitude of apps and services that let you bookmark articles for reading later, just like there are plenty of apps that give you a clean, readable version of any article you give it. And don’t get me started on apps that let you share your content through a social network. Do you really need another timeline?

But how about a service that pulls all of these features together, making it much easier to clean up your articles, store them for later, annotate them and share them when you are done reading them? Yes, it exists, it’s called dotdotdot and it’s available for the iPad! Want to check it out?
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Document organisation is becoming ever more popular with those wanting to move to a paperless workflow. Whilst apps such as Evernote allows us to keep everything in one place, it’s multipurpose functionality can make it a little bit overwhelming when wanting to organise specific documents.

Doo attempts to be your central location for all your documents, regardless of what popular syncing service they may be stored in, whilst using some iOS-specific features that add to the experience. Unfortunately, the experience is one lacking many things. I test drive Doo for iPad to see what it does, though perhaps more accurately, doesn’t do.

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As excited as we get about apps that raise the bar for professionals, the iPad has always been respected as a tool for educators and their students, and this applies to the musical space as much as any other. Back in July, Nathan Snelgrove took a look at a new app from MiQ Limited designed to help budding musicians wrap their heads around some of the theoretical underpinnings of good songwriting.

I found Jamn to be a superb tool for picking up chord theory and kickstarting your songwriting, and the latest update brings with it a brand new feature that builds on the visual learning methods of the first. Is it enough to make Jamn the de-facto app for iPad songwriters? Let’s find out!

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For those who have ever taken a Spanish or French class, you know that language learning can not only be a bore, but very challenging. But the rewards of speaking many languages exceed just that of being fluent in more than one tongue.

So, when I first stumbled upon Duolingo about two years ago, I was very interested. While I don’t remember how I exactly discovered the service, I do know that I am glad that I found it. And today, I’ll be reviewing its iPad app, which was released just this summer. Find out what makes Duolingo so great right after the jump.

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VLC has had a turbulent history on iOS, having already been released before being removed due to a disagreement on the compatibility of VLC’s open-source development with the licensing and DRM that Apple places upon all apps listed on the App Store.

After an absence of a couple of years, VLC is now back in the App Store but this time, it’s here to stay. Let’s take a look at one of the most popular cross-platform media playback apps, now available on iOS.

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For the computer artist, pixels are the medium of choice. They provide every simulated brushstroke, every subtlety of shading, and every colour on the digital palette. Yet, in the majority of modern digital art, pixels are barely visible, much in the same way that individual particles of dyed water are imperceptible when spread across a canvas.

This wasn’t always the case. Once upon a time, individual pixels played a major role in the overall look of a picture. Initially, this was due to the very limited graphical computing power of which early home computers were capable, particularly when such artworks were used together in games, but it was later adopted as a style of digital art in its own right. It was called pixel art.

To this day, pixel art is popular, both for its bright colour schemes, and for its games-related retro coolness. If you find, as I do, that a 16-pixel Mario or Sonic provides irrational visual appeal, then you’ll be pleased to read about Pixaki, a new pixel art creation studio on iPad, retailing at $6.99. Packing retro console template sizes and PSD output, Pixaki is billed as being a professional-level offering. But can a touchscreen app really improve on the pleasing, inherent simplicity of pixel artistry?

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If you actually stop and think about it, the iPhone and iPad has replaced the need for, well, almost everything really. Books, music, photographs, games, satellite navigation… it is all there, packed inside a device as little as half the size of a paperback novel. But can an iPhone or iPad replace the humble Moleskine, an iconic notebook used by people like Vincent van Gogh and Ernest Hemingway since the 19th Century, with Moleskine Journal? Let’s find out!

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