Just over a year ago, I wrote a feature on Mac.AppStorm entitled The Future of Email on OS X. I wrote it as millions of loyal Sparrow users around the world were expressing their discontent at Google buying out their favourite product — understandable, really — as development on the product stopped save for critical bug updates. And it shows — the “latest” version for OS X was released 10 months ago and we never did see the rumoured iPad client, which was a real disappointment.

So this got me thinking: both the Mac and iPhone have seen their share of “alternative email clients”, as I like to dub them, but the iPad has been strangely neglected. The iPhone has seen its fair share of alternative clients, from Dispatch to Triage, but none of these have manifested themselves (yet) into an iPad version. iPad users certainly want an alternative to Mail.app — in a weekly poll we conducted back in March, 73% of you felt that the iPad deserved a better client.

So, in short, what’s the state of alternative iPad email clients?


I’m a fan of getting things done apps, and I have more than one on my iPad. That’s not just because I like them so much, though. One app never seems to have all of the features I want, and I want to create the best task management solution, piecemeal. I’m trying out Todoist, because it seems to have some features I’ve been looking for but haven’t been able to pin down. Will it be all I need in a single app? We’ll see after the jump. (more…)

Writer’s block is a common condition and one that’s really hard to shake off when it hits. Sometimes you’re stuck on how to develop your writing beyond what you have, or sometimes it’s just that you can’t seem to get started. Running out of inspiration is never good, but at least when you’re typing on an iPad, there’s some tools to support your issue.

Prompts is the answer to your creative problem — a simple, minimalist writing app at its core with a bank of more than 1,000 starting lines for your next big hit. Load up the app, start a new piece and use the randomly generated line as your inspiration. Let’s take a look! (more…)

The other day, I tried to work out which single service or platform my digital life couldn’t do without. Initially, I thought Dropbox might be that product, but then I realized I could probably use Box or some other, similar alternative. Google’s collection of apps also entered my consideration, due to my commitment to Gmail, and my reliance on Google’s Calendar and Contacts apps for day-to-day operation. In reality, though, iCloud does a similar job.

Strangely, the one service which stood out was Evernote. I realize that this revelation may cause a few sneers, not least because Evernote is nothing more than a digital scrapbook. I can’t honestly think of how I would replace the ease of web-clipping, note-taking and document filing it provides, though.

Much as I love Evernote, I know it isn’t perfect. For instance, it still works in the same way filing systems have done for years — search, in combination with lists — and it is starting to feel a little bit old. A new, innovative approach to browsing your notes can now be found on your iPad, via a third-party Evernote add-on app named Bubble Browser, currently on sale at $4.99. Its older, OS X sibling has already made waves with us at AppStorm, due to its ease of use and its visually striking design. Can the same magic be recreated on a touchscreen?

Welcome to the fourth installment of Secondary Pythonista. After careful consideration and research over the last two articles we now have a project brief, a plan of attack, and have chosen the tools we’ll need to execute on that plan.

In this article, using the information we’ve compiled previously, we’ll begin executing on those plans. We’ll begin writing code in Pythonista. As we do that, the value of all the pre-work that we did will become quickly apparent. There’s a strong temptation to dive head-first into writing code, but the careful and methodical approach we’ve gone with for this tutorial as many benefits, including giving you, dear reader, a better understanding of the why we’re programming a certain way in addition to the how to program in that manner.

So let’s get to it!


If you’re a college student then it’s time to start packing your things and buying this year’s textbooks. As you prepare to return to school you may be moving into a new apartment, dorm room or sorority/fraternity house. If you’re lucky enough to have a kitchen to cook in, you’ll be looking for simple, easy recipes. Fridge and cupboard storage space is probably limited and a student’s budget means the kitchen is only outfitted with basic utensils and appliances. You would be doing good just to avoid ordering pizza every night, so trendy, cheffy recipes are out and affordable, satisfying recipes are in.

As a busy student, your iPad is the key to avoiding takeout and enjoying healthy, home cooked meals. Choosing the right apps will ensure you’ve got great resources for finding quick, easy, affordable recipes and executing them successfully. I’ve carefully searched the Appstore to create a collection of must-have cooking apps for college students. Keep reading to get my top five picks for scholarly foodies.


I’ve been using iPads for quite some time now, or at least, it feels like I have. When I got an iPad, people still thought you couldn’t get any work done on them, and I remember being consistently flustered about that. I mean, I was able to get work done–why couldn’t anybody else?


The reality of the world we live in today is one of complexity. The world has progressed so much that the complexity of things like our everyday technology or infrastructure seems elementary to us. In fact, it is quite hard for anyone these days to fathom a world without these luxuries, let alone the world at its conception.

In Doodle God HD, that simple world is at your disposal. Creation is at your finger tips, and it is you who crafts the world as you know it. Read more about the crazy world of Doodle God HD right after the jump.


You’d think the iPad had seen its fair share of note-taking applications, but you’d be wrong entirely. Last month, NoteSuite came along — and it really impressed me. I gave it a commendable out of 10 in our review from last month for its uncluttered interface, impressive feature set and ease of use. The developers of NoteSuite have certainly learnt from the problems that plagued Projectbook, the app’s predecessor and it is, in my opinion, one of the best iPad note-taking applications out there.

And now, thanks to the kindness of the developers, we’ve got 10, yes 10, promotional codes (each one worth $4.99) which we’re giving away to our readers!


Take a 15 by 15 grid and add one hundred tiles, each with a letter (excepting two blanks), whose distribution and point values were determined by performing frequency analysis from sources including the New York Times. What you have is a 75-year old word game, Scrabble®, that is the world’s second-best selling board game after Monopoly®. It is estimated that one-third of American homes has a Scrabble board.

It’s been one of the best-selling on iOS devices, since it was introduced, maintaining a position usually within the top 50 best selling apps. And now it has received a major revamp.


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