Dorie Greenspan is a name synonymous with French cookery and patisserie. Her long career in the food scene is marked by many achievements, including working with notable cooks like Julia Child, Daniel Boulud and Jean-Georges Vongerichten. An accomplished cook and author; Dorie is recognized as a guru in all things baking. She wrote the James Beard award-winning Baking: From My Home to Yours, and her app, Baking with Dori! brings that invaluable text to life. If you love to bake you’ve got to download this app, a collection of personalized classic recipes with videos to guide you every step of the way.

Keep reading to find out more about this essential baking resource.


This week’s collection of games has a cinematic feel to it, with grade-A graphics and animation, creative storylines and other highly unique and entertaining qualities. Learn the stories behind SpongeBob’s Bikini Bottom and build your own version of the town, plus save Hollywood — and some of its best-loved films — from hordes of zombies.

You’ll also have the opportunity to sail the seas with some Scurvy Scallywags, aka treasuring-hunting pirates, and fill the shoes of a Runaway dodging the mafia. It’s all inside this edition of iPad games. Click through to get started. (more…)

I don’t know whether you’ve noticed, but we — humans, that is — often struggle to remember things. Hence, note-taking is an inherent part of any functional organizational workflow. It is little wonder, then, that numerous app developers have, over the years, attempted to ween us off the good old pen and paper, and move us over to a more technologically advanced method of thought tracking.

For a time, I was drawn in by some of these efforts. I flirted with the creative, freehand reminders which Paper makes possible. I came to the Evernote party relatively late, but I now use it every day to keep my digital life in order. As far as I’m concerned, however, it’s still the case that nothing beats the flexibility and ease of access a real-life notebook can offer. No matter how hard an app tries, it isn’t as visually available as a Post-it note, nor is any touchscreen as sensitive as a thin, bleached slice of tree. What’s more, typed text is ordered — our thoughts, generally, are not.

That is why I’m cautiously enthusiastic about Chisel. Designed to be the one and only digital note-taking app you’re ever going to need, it includes the ability to record your thoughts as text, drawings and annotations.

Can Chisel really strike a decisive blow for digital note-taking? Let the scribbling and typing commence.


After the last article you should now be familiar with the Pythonista app as well as the eager community of developers which support it. While we did create a new script and learn how to import other scripts into Pythonista, we didn’t actually write any Python code. And while we won’t be writing any scripts from scratch this time, we will be learning how to read a Python program, as well as to modify certain aspects of it to add functionality or make it our own.


When I was in my third year of university, I became a professional procrastinator. By that, I mean that I had no work and no reason to find work because I was too “busy” with school and prepping for exams. And what that really meant was that I was too “busy” playing Flash-based games on an old MacBook. This was back when Facebook gaming was still a popular thing.

In that day, I was completely hooked on a game called Solitaire Blitz, which now has a universal iPhone/iPad app and is available for free in the App Store. I couldn’t resist the opportunity to pick up the game and try it out again, and see how I felt about it a couple years later on a different platform. And how well can a free game filled with in-app purchases designed for a mouse translate to a touch screen? Read on to find out more.


こんにちは!お元気ですか? At least that’s what you’ll be saying a couple of weeks after using Japanese from MindSnacks – a really fun and easy way to learn basic Japanese on your iPad (the phrase means, “Hello! How are you?”). I’m a real sucker for language learning apps (seeing as I learn German) and any new ones instantly attract my attention. But, most of the offerings out there on the App Store seem to just be either just phrasebooks, offering you the kind of vocabulary that you would only need to get by a tourist, or just flashcard apps where you have to memorise a list of set phrases, without actually understanding the language properly.

Japanese is different, however. It uses a variety of different games and techniques to help you learn a language properly, instead of just repeating it parrot-fashion. MindSnacks, the developers, also offer similar apps for learning either French, German, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese or Chinese, but what really interested me about Japanese is precisely how the app teaches you to read the language (i.e. how does the user actually learn the Japanese characters), as the Japanese language is not only extremely difficult to learn for native speakers of English, but the many different writing systems (romanji, katakana, kanji and hiragana).

Let’s dive right in and find out if Japanese by MindSnacks is the best way to learn this fantastic and diverse language on your iPad.


Cards on the table, I don’t practice my math skills as much as I should. After years of expensive education, I’ve sort of given up and figure I’ve probably forgotten all of those classes. Can I do multiplication anymore? What is division even? Addtraction is a thing, right?

That’s why I decided to give Sakura Quick Math a go. It’s a great app for brushing up my basic math skills as an adult, and it can even help kids who are still trying to get things figured out. I’ll see if it can set me straight and whether I can get back on track. (more…)

I love reading the news on my iPad, especially because its big screen is very convenient to have a quick glance at the headlines and read them when seating comfortably. While there are a bunch of great news aggregators and RSS readers on the App Store, I wanted an app with a simple interface, great features and, most importantly, one that could sync with Google Reader — or a replacement service. Newsify was exactly what I was looking for: a clean interface, superloaded features and synchronization with Google Reader, which the developers will soon replace with Feedly.

With all of the talk about the release of iOS 7 and a change to a flatter, less skeuomorphic design, we’ve been wondering how Apple would accomplish the move without losing clarity. After all, a pretty interface isn’t any good to anyone if you can’t get it to do what you want.

Apple closed out their WWDC 2013 keynote with an introduction to iOS 7, and a huge focus was on how it looks. We know Apple can make something look nice, but can a flatter design make iOS work better on your iPad? (more…)

Today, Apple unveiled their newest iteration of iOS (appropriately called iOS 7) at WWDC. It features a complete redesign that re-envisions what is possible with an iPhone and iPad while adding a ton of great new features that make it even better for Apple’s power users. Let’s check out what iOS 7 brings to the table. (more…)

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