I don’t know about you, but I’ve already had too much chocolate, scoffed down too many cookies and over-indulged in eggnog at one too many Christmas parties. I’ve had enough and I’m ready to skip the holidays and jump right in to my New Year’s detox. I’m craving fresh fruits and vegetables, looking for recipes that renew and revitalize. To get through the rest of the holiday season, I’ve downloaded The Whole Pantry, a gorgeous collection of vegetarian recipes aimed at restoring balance and promoting health. The app aims to be the whole package, empowering users with lifestyle guides and a “food is thy medicine” philosophy to health. Need another reason to check out this app right now? They’ve just added their first Lifestyle Pack to get you through the holiday season with 15 festive gluten and sugar-free recipes.

If you’re into vegetarian, vegan, gluten free or Paleo– or you just want to balance all that holiday indulgence with some nourishing meals, keep reading to find out more about The Whole Pantry.

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When the iPad was first unveiled, there were three thoughts on many of our minds: “What a terrible name. This thing will be amazing for reading though. Oh, and it’ll be perfect for artists!”

Okay, that what might have been what I thought, but the point stands: I thought that the iPad would be perfect for anybody who needed a good place to draw. Marry it with a decent stylus and you can have an entirely paperless workflow. Until recently, though, I didn’t do a lot of it myself because I hadn’t been using just the right app. That’s when I found Procreate, an artist’s dream toolbox. Read on to find out how Procreate beats all the other competition.

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Most iPad owners I meet are content with using the apps provided by Apple. Whether it’s from lack of interest or uncertainty about what’s available in the App Store, they stick with what’s provided to them and go about their business. I, on the other hand, only use a few of Apple’s apps for which alternatives are available and stash the rest away in a folder. There are many reasons why I opt for third-party apps, but anyone that visits an app review blog, such as yourself, probably doesn’t need must explanation why they’re often much better.

With iOS 7’s release, a few of Apple’s apps that I abandoned long ago got a reprieve; mainly due each app’s stark redesign from their iOS 6 predecessor. Of those apps, iTunes Movie Trailers is by far one of my favorites. Beforehand, I was using a combination Wigglehop, Fandango and Google for all my theater going excursions, but now Apple’s all-in-one movie app offers nearly all the information and features I’ll ever need. (more…)

There’s been a ton of hubbub in the past year or so about achieving Inbox Zero, which is apparently some sort of Nirvana for the Millenials, as they’re called. Well, I’ve got news for you: it’s not going to happen. There’s no app that will make Inbox Zero work for you because, as a concept, Inbox Zero is idiotic — no intended offence, of course. The problem isn’t that people get too much email. The problem is that our email spends too much time trying to get our attention.

A ton of people, though, have understandably misunderstood this. Instead of trying to make meaningful differences in the way we check, read, and send email, most apps are trying to make differences in the way we categorize it. That’s wrong. The Delete button is my favourite, and if you think there’s any other way to truly get rid of everything in your inbox, you’re cheating.

So I’m excited to say this: myMail is the email app that actually solves the problem. Read on for more about what this app does so well.

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Wikipedia is one of those services that’s incredibly valuable to me. I’ve been using it for so long that it feels seminal to my experiences on the Internet — although I know I’ve been online longer than Wikipedia has, I don’t remember a time when Wikipedia wasn’t around. (Maybe that just means I’m too young.)

I’m always on the hunt for new Wikipedia apps. The service has an interface that, while it works on mobile displays, it could certainly benefit from the native UI and experience that an app could bring. This is why I was so interested in checking out Wikipanion Plus. It’s the first Wikipedia app to get an iOS 7 design, and I wanted to see what I was missing out on. Read on to find out what I think about the popular Wikipedia app.

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I’m a typography geek. I’ve written about it before, I’ve agonized over it before, and I’ve dreamt about if before. I’ve spent money on it (more than I’d maybe like to admit), and I’ve attended tours of old library vaults just to take a look at some print type from the Gutenberg days. Tonight, I was out at a family dinner at a restaurant and spent an inordinate amount of time staring at the menu because I thought it was written with Memphis Std Medium. (I think I ended up being wrong, but it was a close call.)

As a game, then, Type:Rider really excites me. The game is focused on a visual history of typography that’s reminiscent of some of my favourite iOS games to date — games like Rayman: Jungle Run and BADLAND. Its unique visual style and accessible gameplay makes it a winner for typography geeks and their normal friends. Read on to find out what makes Type:Rider an unforgettable experience.

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It’s cold outside, and what better way to stay warm than firing up the oven for a bit of baking? This is the time of year for festive cakes, pillowy breads and comforting scones. Baking is a great way to slow down and enjoy the holiday season, whether you’ve got the kids in the kitchen helping or you’re just enjoying a bit of solitary quiet time in the early morning hours. Some may find the idea of baking stressful, but it doesn’t have to be. The Photo Cookbook – Baking promises to keep recipes simple and straightforward, with plenty of step-by-step photos to ensure your baked goods come out perfectly.

Does this app have all you need to bake your way through these cold winter days? Keep reading to find out.

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Reading is a topic that a lot of us get fired up about, mainly because we all do so much of it. It’s a field many of us are very experienced in. When people make decisions about buying a hardcore or a softcover book, they’re using their experience to make that choice. That’s why talking about the perfect reading experience is so tough — no two people have the same tastes.

That’s my word of warning as I enter into this: the following article, even more so than usual, is nothing more than my opinion. But let me be the one to tell you, and I hope you’ll agree, my opinion is certainly the most correct one. I’ll start by saying that the new iBooks for iOS 7 is terrible. Whereas before, choosing between iBooks and Kindle was tough, the decision just got a whole lot easier. Quite simply, I’m about to tell you why I prefer the Kindle experience over iBooks.

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When inspiration strikes, out of the blue, as you’re making coffee or walking the dog, the feeling of uplift and excitement is hard to match. For most of us, these are purely chance moments, when events and surroundings combine to create a spark. But for those in the creative professions, it can’t be like that. There simply isn’t time to wait around for the mental light bulb to flicker into life. For creatives, inspiration needs to be engineered, manufactured even, and most achieve this by collecting inspiring stuff and keeping it nearby.

The scrapbooks and swatches once used for this purpose have now been replaced by digital formats. Some folks go for social (Pinterest), some for private (Icebergs & Ember), but the recurring theme is the clipping of digital files into virtual pinboards of creative ideas.

Strangely, the iPad, a device that seems so suited to visuals and is intuitive in its operation, has yet to see much love in the scrapbooking genre — a fact which an aptly named new app, Curator, wants to change. With a sleek, minimalist interface and simple controls, Curator will certainly appeal to creative folk on an aesthetic level; but what about on a practical one?

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I was a huge fan of Rayman: Jungle Run last year when it came out. In fact, I loved it so much that I gave it a near-perfect review, praising its gameplay, visually-arresting art design, and unique twist on the platforming genre. With Rayman: Fiesta Run, Ubisoft is trying to raise the bar again.

The sequel brings a ton of new elements to the game, including swimming and, perhaps regrettably, in-app purchases. This review is a unique opportunity for me to reflect on what worked with the original, what still works, and what the formula is like a year later. Is a sequel necessary? Did the first game need little refinements? Read on to find out.

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