Creating Resumes: 3 Apps to Get You Work

One of the most efficient uses for the iPad is in the business world. There are plenty of apps out there for business and productivity that have been covered here on iPad.Appstorm, but what about apps for helping you find and get a job?

Back in December I wrote a round up of 15 Apps to Land Your Next Job. One of the big keys to getting the career you want is in the first impression, which is why I wanted to compare in more depth the three apps listed in that article for creating and sharing your resume.

All three include the ability to input your career information, create multiple resumes, and choose from a variety of templates. However, there are some significant differences between the apps. So, let’s determine which one is best for your job seeking needs!


Like the article? Be sure to subscribe to our RSS feed and follow us on Twitter to stay up on recent content.

kyCVwy

kyCVwykyCVwy is made by French developer, Appnotie and stands for “keep your CV with you.” For those of you who are unfamiliar with the term CV (curriculum vitae), it is a document very similar to a standard resume.

While the name of the app is a mouthful, the app is fairly easy to learn and inputting information is simple. Unlike the other two apps I’ll review, you can choose to add a picture from your camera roll or take a picture. There is even the option to crop and change it to black and white.

There are 6 resume templates available to choose from and you can send it to an AirPrint printer or email it in PDF format. The latest version added a feature to convert your resume into any number of different languages, but it only changes the titles of each category not the information inputted. Most of the supported languages are from countries in Europe.

kyCVwy resume

kyCVwy is the only app out of the 3 that can create cover letters.

Another feature unavailable in the other two apps is the ability to create a cover letter. While this is possible in kyCVwy, there are no templates available for cover letters, so you’ll need to write the entire letter as you would in any word processing software.

Overall, the app is pretty useful with a few things that differentiate it such as the ability to include pictures and cover letters. My only complaints are that landscape mode is not an option, there is no spell correction, and the English version had spelling errors throughout which made it feel unpolished.

ResumeBase

ResumeBaseAt first glance, ResumeBase has a more elegant, modern design than kyCVwy. ResumeBase is also more customizable than kyCVwy in that it allows you to add all your information and then choose what to include on each resume you create without having to input everything again.

To me, this is the main distinguishing feature of this app and is especially handy if you are applying for jobs in different fields.

The black and white color scheme gives ResumeBase a contemporary look.

You can print your resume from the app or save it in rich text (.rtf) or plain text (.txt) format.

There is also the option to include your social networks on your resume and add references using the information from your address book.

As we all know, having a spelling mistake on your resume is a major faux pas, so I was happy to see that spell check was included. You can create your resume using two types, chronological and functional, which are both very similar and then you can choose from four different font sizes and types. The biggest drawback to ResumeBase is that it doesn’t provide a way to create cover letters, so you’ll need another app for that.

Pocket Resume

Pocket ResumePocket Resume was the third app I tried out for creating resumes. While this app has some strong points and seems to be the most talked about in this category, its usefulness will depend on what you need to do. For instance, Pocket Resume doesn’t include a way to create cover letters or print your resume.

Also, while 8 templates are included, there are very minor differences between each one. Most of them are simply changes between font styles and colors, not major differences in layout.

The standard layout for most resumes created in Pocket Resume is simple, but it gets the job done.

However, there are some nice features such as the ability to import your information from a LinkedIn profile. There are more options than the other two apps for sharing or exporting your resume as well. You can share it through email, DropBox, or export to PDF or RTF format for editing on your computer. Furthermore, I appreciated the aesthetic design of Pocket Resume which looks like a portfolio with paper and leather textured backgrounds throughout.

Which One Is Right for You?

All three apps cost $2.99, so you’re left to decide purely on features alone. Each of these apps seemed to work as described and didn’t take much time to learn. In all three instances I was able to jump into creating a resume within minutes.

One of the few hindrances I noticed was the language barrier. As an American I had to get used to the different terminology used in some of these apps that were created from developers in other countries, like the expression “referees” instead of “references” in ResumeBase.

Which one you choose will really depend on your needs. Either way, it’s great to have your resume with you whenever you’re on the go. If the capability to print is important to you, then you’ll want either kyCVwy or ResumeBase. If you don’t need to be able to print and prefer more options for ways to share your resume digitally, then you would probably be more inclined to pick Pocket Resume. Also, if using just one app to create both your resume and cover letter is appealing you’ll want kyCVwy.

Having your iPad and one of these apps on hand will ensure that you’re prepared if any job opportunity comes your way. Have you used one of these apps? What are your needs for creating and sharing resumes?


theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow