Trivi.al Brings Competitive Trivia Games To iOS

If you’re a trivia fan, you’ll be happy to know that the makers of Trivi.al have introduced an app to fulfil your trivia needs amongst your friends. Instead of sitting at home answering questions online, you can now compete with tons of people and outsmart them using your general knowledge.

Trivi.al is doing what Rumble did for Boggle by digitising a classic form of entertainment and making it more accessible to the world, enhancing the experience due to the competition you have. Let’s take a look at what this app is all about.

Starting Off

As soon as you open the app, you have the option to integrate Facebook into your trivia experience by signing in with your Facebook account, or using your email address. If you opt for Facebook, you’ll have to allow the app to access your friends list before you begin.

When I logged in via email, I had some loading issues, however this may not be the same for everyone.

Initial screen

Initial screen

After that, you are taken to the game’s main screen which displays your IQ (your gauge of how “smart” you are), which increases depending on the amount of correct answers you get. Every new player starts off with 90 IQ. The higher a player’s IQ, the harder the questions are.

Also displayed on the main screen is your profile picture (if using Facebook), your current games and your common cents, which are the game’s currency. You use this currency to play games and purchase powers-ups (more on that in a bit). Each game costs 8 common cents to play.

The home screen

The home screen

There are two ways to increase your common cents. Every 20 minutes, the game will increase your common cents by a few. The other option is instead of biding your time, you can purchase more common cents (though you shouldn’t need to) as an in-app purchase.

This kind of thing is becoming more and more popular in apps; instead of making them pay for the app initially, make them pay to enhance or continue their experience. I personally have never bought something inside an app, but I guess a lot of people do.

Coin prices

Coin prices

You can start a game by tapping the New Game icon at the top-left corner of the display. You can start a game with your Facebook friends, a random opponent or you can search for someone by username. You have the option to add up to two power ups which are priced at 1, 2 and 3 common cents that help you if you get stuck.

Power-ups

Power-ups

The faster you complete a question, the more points you get as a result, so using something like the power up Slowmo, you have more time to answer the question meaning you will probably score more points if you’re correct. If you complete two correct answers in succession, you also get additional points.

The Trivia

Now on to the core aspect of the app, the trivia itself. In each game, both players have to answer three rounds of questions and amass more overall points than their opponent to win. The questions are a mixed bunch, ranging from questions on science and geology to 19th century history and company slogans. There was even a question about one of the early versions of OSX, Cheetah.

A typical question

A typical question

One thing worth mentioning is that the questions seem heavily geared to appeal to the United States, as there was a lot of American history and American companies that came up in the questions. This may be good or bad if you live outside the U.S., however I personally found it hard to keep up, being from the UK.

There were a few repeats now and again, but I guess that’s almost necessary to improve your retention of the new information. I would’ve liked to see a little wider variety of questions that aren’t geared towards a particular region such as science or more general knowledge questions.

Design

First of all, this app has the same music all the way throughout the game. It’s incredibly repetitive, and I found it a little annoying, to be honest. Luckily, you have the option to turn it off along with the sound effects in the settings of the app, which are accessible by touching the icon in the top right of the main screen.

Switching of music and/or sound effects

Switching of music and/or sound effects

The app isn’t amazing aesthetically; to me it feels a little blocky and thick. It seems a little unorganised too, as it took me a little while to figure out what everything was. It’s not really in line with the minimalism that’s becoming more popular among designers, which is something I’m used to.

Functionality

The app relies heavily on Facebook to support things such as lists of equivalent intelligences and inviting friends, but it’s not a bad way to go about it. This app isn’t really for everyone; the market it’s aimed at is a little unclear, however linking in through Facebook means all the trivia fans can invite each other to play.

It’s unclear whether this will give the app the critical mass it needs to take off and be a success, but it’s a great way to go about playing trivia in your spare time; it’s certainly a bit more enriching than Draw Something. The power ups that should act as a sort of last resort system don’t really seem necessary, to be honest.

If you have close family or friends that love trivia, you can have great fun playing this app with them. With the IQ system, there’s always that drive to be better. Also, you’ll always get paired up with someone with similar IQ when looking for a random opponent, so you’ll never be short of people to face.

Conclusion

Overall, this is a well rounded trivia app that brings the experience to your friends and family. There are a few design flaws, however that doesn’t mean you can get your daily dosage of trivia and not have fun. Hopefully this app will grow so many more people will be able to compete with you, and the users playing it will ultimately decide the fate of the app.


Summary

A basic but fun way to get your daily trivia dose.

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  • http://trivi.al Matt Hudson

    Thanks for the coverage, we appreciate it.

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