Todoist: The Task Management Superhero

I’m a fan of getting things done apps, and I have more than one on my iPad. That’s not just because I like them so much, though. One app never seems to have all of the features I want, and I want to create the best task management solution, piecemeal. I’m trying out Todoist, because it seems to have some features I’ve been looking for but haven’t been able to pin down. Will it be all I need in a single app? We’ll see after the jump.

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Better Project Management

To get started with Todoist, you’ll want to create some new projects. These are like task lists, but even better. They certainly do house all of your tasks, but Todoist’s projects go further than that. Create sub-projects to serve as task lists within lists. If a project has a bunch of steps, it can become overwhelming to lay all of that out in a big stream of todos, but Todoist makes it crazy simple to sort all of that into lots of levels of task management.

Create a new project and start adding tasks.

Create a new project and start adding tasks.

Once you’ve got a new project, start adding tasks. Add a title, move it around among your different projects, and set a due date. Tag your task with a label and set a priority, too. If your task is part of a larger task that doesn’t really deserve its own project, make it a sub-task. It will appear indented so you know it’s part of another task and doesn’t exist all on its own.

Edit your tasks and set their options.

Edit your tasks and set their options.

All of your tasks due today will show up in the Today folder. The same goes for anything that needs doing in the next week; all of that appears in the Next 7 Days folder. New and unsorted tasks will hit your inbox first. You can further filter your tasks by priority or just check out anything that doesn’t have a due date attached. That last one is a good way to catch anything that may be falling through the cracks and make sure to set a date to tasks that were entered on the fly.

Todoist automatically syncs with the web app, so if you ever need to get to your projects and task but your iPad isn’t close at hand, just log on to the website. There are a few more features available on the web version of Todoist, so it’s not a bad idea to check out what’s there, even if your iPad is glued to your palm. If you’re looking for something truly multi-platform, Todoist has your back, covering not just iOS devices and your Mac, but also Android and Windows. There are plenty of browser extensions to make Todoist work to its potential for you, too.

Stay on track with the Inbox and Today folders.

Stay on track with the Inbox and Today folders.

Paying to Get What You Want

Todoist works pretty great as is, but you’ll run into some walls using the free service. If you try to create filters or sort by labels, Todoist brings you up short. That’s only available through the premium service. There also aren’t any reminders in Todoist unless you pay up, and you can’t upload or email new tasks to the app. You won’t be able to sync with Calendar or get access to the project templates, either.

While I really like Todoist out of the box, I’d like to use those better search functions, especially the labels. The reminders may be a deal breaker, too, especially on a task management app that functions so well otherwise. It’s not just a matter of upgrading to the paid version or making an in-app purchase, though. Todoist requires a subscription, which is probably my least favorite thing that doesn’t involve artificial sweetener. You’ll have to roll out about $30 a year, which breaks down to $2.50/month. That isn’t actually all that much if we’re being brutally honest, but I’m not sure the goods are there to justify it. Is the ability to more easily search all of my tasks really worth 30 bucks? Maybe, but probably not.

Sort and search your tasks.

Sort and search your tasks.

Final Thoughts

I’m really liking Todoist, and if you’re not getting all of the organization you want out of your current task manager, this is one to try. Make lists within lists within lists, and then inside of those lists, make some more lists if you need to. You can do what you need to do so that you’ll get the job done. Todoist really does empower you to become a getting things done conqueror.

But unless you want to lay out some cash, Todoist will conveniently forget to let you know it’s time to do all of that conquering. For an app this powerful, you’ll need reminders. You’re probably going to want support for Calendar, too. It’s a great little app out of the box, but it really is missing some key features. If you’re willing to pay for Todoist, you’re going to have a top-notch app, but otherwise, you’re going to long for some of those extras.


Summary

Great for super organized task lists, but all the best features are locked behind a pay wall.

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