Wallet: Your Secure Info Is Now on iPad

For most power users (and I’ll assume that most of you are), security is important. Even for you non-power users, it should be important. Don’t make the tragic slip-up of using “123456” as your password for every site and service you frequent. But when you start using a different complex, alphanumeric password for every login, how do you keep track of them?

We have discussed (at length) the merits of and differences between Wallet and 1Password (and even some other competitors) here on AppStorm. As a big fan of Acrylic Apps, I tend to lean toward Wallet, but it even slipped past me when Acrylic quietly updated the iOS version to a universal app, complete with a freshly designed, iPad-optimized interface. It should go without saying, but if you already own the iPhone app, you’ll have access to the iPad version for no additional charge. However, if you haven’t sprung for Wallet on iOS yet, will the iPad version be the deciding factor?


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Under Lock and Key

A good password manager is password protected itself, and Wallet is no exception. When you launch the app, you’re greeted by the comfortingly secure vault door, that will only open for your preprogrammed password. Wallet also takes the liberty of informing you of the strength of your password so you can achieve the most in data security, but more on that later.

Ain't no one getting through here.

Ain't no one getting through here.

Once you get past the vault door, the gorgeous faux-leather interface is displayed, which shows your data sorted by group. Wallet defaults to three groups: Serial Numbers, Web Passwords, and Credit Cards. However, new groups can be added, and a handful of built-in group icons ensures that you’ll be able to keep several different types of data safe. Tap on the + button above the sidebar to create a new group.

I've chosen not to display my actual bank account numbers, for obvious reasons.

I've chosen not to display my actual bank account numbers, for obvious reasons.

Inside of a group, you can tap the other + button to create a new entry. Each entry is highly customizable, allowing you to add and remove fields containing any sort of useful data you might need. You can also attach photos or add notes. This can be particularly helpful when you amass a vast number of login credentials that you need to keep track of.

Put in your credentials for one-touch logins.

Put in your credentials for one-touch logins.

As long as your entry contains a username, password, and URL, you’ll be able to tap the arrow button next to the service name to launch the built-in webkit browser, and Wallet will automatically fill in the credentials for you. Unfortunately, this is the only way to utilize Wallet’s autofill feature on iOS. Presumably, this is because Safari on iOS doesn’t have the versatility to handle extensions the same way that Safari on Mac does, but hopefully we’ll see this capability added in the future. It would certainly provide a more seamless browsing experience.

The built in webkit browser. Not bad, but still not mobile Safari.

The built in webkit browser. Not bad, but still not mobile Safari.

Under the Hood

If you tap on the universally recognized gear button in the top right corner of the app’s interface, you’ll see a Preferences window pop up. It is here that you can toggle and change your universal password for Wallet, and where you’ll be able to see if Wallet has dubbed your password strong enough to protect the data inside.

I wonder if iCloud sync is coming.

I wonder if iCloud sync is coming.

A bit further down in the Preferences are the Sync settings, because what good is having the iOS version of a Mac app if the data won’t sync? Acrylic has had the foresight to include several options for syncing, including MobileMe (why?), WebDAV, and Dropbox. I’ve chosen to sync using Dropbox, and doing so is a matter of inputting your login information and allowing Wallet to verify those credentials.

Once a sync method is chosen and verified, a sync button appears on the app’s main interface. Use this to push your changes through to any other instances of the app that you’re running on your devices.

Please wait...

Please wait...

The Verdict

Wallet for iPad is definitely pretty, and an app scores big points with me if it has style. The icon looks great on my home screen, and interface has just enough of that real-world mimicry to be visually pleasing without being overtly obnoxious.

The fact that the autofill feature can only be used from inside the app, and not while browsing in mobile Safari is my biggest complaint. While I’m not entirely sure about the logistics of including such functionality, given that I’m no iOS developer, I’m inclined to think that this is an Apple-imposed limitation, so I choose to give Acrylic the benefit of the doubt.

Beyond that, I found Wallet for iPad to be a beautifully designed extension of my favorite password management app on my Mac. Have you given Wallet a try? Is it appropriately outfitted to help your workflow, or are there some big missing features? Let us know in the comments.


Summary

Acrylic's password manager for Mac and iPhone is now iPad compatible. Take your data with you anywhere you go.

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  • Daryl Griffiths

    Lastpass works fine in Safari once you install the bookmarklets. They don’t make as much of it as they should IMO.

    • Joel Bankhead

      That’s interesting, I’ll have to check out Lastpass with Mobile Safari…

  • Haymoose

    1Password has the same limitation. I look forward like many iOS developers must as well (I am not a dev) for mobile Safari to support all of the standard Safari extensions. I bet you Acrylic will be the first to integrate a Wallet for iOS extension with iCloud syncing and everything.

    Just wait for extension support for mobile Safari. Maybe iOS 6?

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