Posts Tagged

iOS

Writer Pro is a bit bipolar. On the Mac, the app takes writing to a different level; elevating Markdown and a clean workflow into a smooth running system that is a pleasure to use. But on iOS, it’s a mess with very little reason to appear on your homescreen. And both apps cost $19.95.

And so, I’m conflicted. I like using Writer Pro, but I don’t enjoy using it on both platforms. In addition, new additional information about the developers has appeared, making me feel even worse. So should you spend $20 or $40 on the Writer Pro app system, or is it best to just walk away? Let’s find out. (more…)

Last month, I was loafing round the house with my phone wondering how cold it was outside. Being the ridiculously technology-glued person I am, I started searching for a weather station that integrates with the Web, tablets, and smartphones. (Obviously, stepping into the sun was out of the question, because I’m a vampire [they’re real]). After a few clicks, I found the Netatmo, a very slick looking solution to checking the weather when you’re not in a walking mood.

The very idea of this may sound ridiculous, I know. However, there is a purpose for everything and I decided to give Netatmo a try. After all, Wired and Time wouldn’t feature it unless there is something more than the basic weather station. Or so I thought. (more…)

iOS 7 was the largest upgrade to iOS ever. It brought along a completely new design language on both the iPhone and iPad, and unlocked various APIs that have made applications more useful and powerful. It also introduced new technologies and APIs, such as iBeacon, that should become only more useful as time goes on.

In terms of usability, however, it offered no major advances for the iPad. In a world where tablets are increasingly being used in lieu of laptops, iOS on the iPad needs to mature, and fast. (more…)

Let’s face it: the App Store teems with fast-paced games packed with action and suspense, especially on the iPad end of the spectrum because developers have so much space to use to their advantage. It’s all about the next new zombie game, or the arcade game that brings a new twist on an old classic. However, there are only so many of these games you can try out before they become stale.

KAMI gives a breath of fresh air to the gaming department by stripping away all the action and creating a laid-back, meditative gaming environment that can’t be found in many games these days. Does it compete with its action-packed competitors? Find out after the jump.
(more…)

Let me get this out of the way: iOS 7 is great. I love it. But it’s not perfect. There’s a million fantastic improvements, but there’s also a few things that Apple still hasn’t gotten around to improving. I’m not talking about design problems (although there are a couple of those), but rather about some of the little quirks that still drive me crazy.

With that in mind, this is my attempt to keep a small log of the things that really bother me. Consider this is a wish list of tiny things I wish Apple would get around to in iOS 7.1.

(more…)

Well, we’ve come to the conclusion of our Secondary Pythonista series. “Evaluating the End Product” is the title, but if you’ve been following along at home, you know our script is not complete. In the first part of this article we’ll finalize the script. In the second part we’ll review what we’ve done through this series, and where we could go with our little script.

(more…)

In our last Secondary Pythonista article we covered a lot of good ground. We went from no written code to a working script which collects ids corresponding to the articles we’re looking to compile. And it’s all been with less than 30 lines of code. Pretty fantastic.

But we still have a ways to go before we can consider our script even remotely “finished”. Today we’ll start harvesting the output we want to compile, storing it in the best manner possible to be retrieved later, all with a view towards final output.

(more…)

Welcome to the fourth installment of Secondary Pythonista. After careful consideration and research over the last two articles we now have a project brief, a plan of attack, and have chosen the tools we’ll need to execute on that plan.

In this article, using the information we’ve compiled previously, we’ll begin executing on those plans. We’ll begin writing code in Pythonista. As we do that, the value of all the pre-work that we did will become quickly apparent. There’s a strong temptation to dive head-first into writing code, but the careful and methodical approach we’ve gone with for this tutorial as many benefits, including giving you, dear reader, a better understanding of the why we’re programming a certain way in addition to the how to program in that manner.

So let’s get to it!

(more…)

Hopefully you’ve been keeping pace with our new Secondary Pythonista series. In our last article we were presented with the project brief for our script. This kind of brief, some sort of starting point, is essential to creating a good script. Without a sense of direction, without a clear goal in mind, the script will be aimless, essentially useless, and may never end up being completed to any functional degree.

(more…)

Programming languages are practical tools used to solve real-life problems. So naturally, the best way to learn a programming language — and by extension a programming utility like Pythonista — is by solving a real-life problem with it. That’s what we’re going to do here in Secondary Python, take an idea for a program, something that solves a problem, and then use Python and Pythonista to build a solution to that problem.

So without further ado, lets examine the project brief.
(more…)

Page 1 of 41234
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow