Posts Tagged

newsstand

The update to iOS 7 is huge. I feel like I’ve read a few thousand articles about each of the new features — from the new multi-tasking to Notification Centre — but very few articles about the new apps in iOS 7. That needs to change. After all, these are the very first stock iOS apps to be designed from the get-go with the big screen in mind. Let’s not forget that the iPad wasn’t around until iOS 4.

Over the years, a lot of us have replaced the stock iOS apps on our iPads with apps that were more aesthetically beautiful or functional. iOS 7 is such a significant change that it’s time to revisit those stock apps and see if they’re worth keeping around. Without further ado, read on for our thoughts on the iPad’s stock apps.

(more…)

In 2007, the world was a different place. The App Store didn’t exist yet, and the iPhone had just been announced. Steve Jobs wanted consumers to fill their iPhones with web apps. Before they debuted the App Store, Apple tried to prove that web apps could be as easy to use and as responsive as native apps. Although web apps didn’t succeed the way Jobs originally intended them to, that doesn’t mean they’re not worth exploring.

In the last two articles on digital publishing and the iPad, we took in-depth looks at a lot of apps that offer magazine services on iOS, including Zinio, apps on Apple’s Newsstand, and Flipboard. They’re just the beginning of the digital publishing movement. Magazine publishers all over the world are also investing in HTML-based web apps that come with a lot of benefits for both them and readers. But there are two big questions everybody always asks about web apps, even my own mother when I explained this article to her: “What is it; why bother?” and “Are they better than the apps I’ve already got installed on my iPad?” Read on to get my take on it.

(more…)

When asked why Apple didn’t license its Macintosh operating system, Steve Jobs always quoted Alan Kay: “People who are serious about software should build their own hardware.” In the same sense, his Newsstand app on the iPad is starting to fuel a similar revolution amongst writers. If fact, if I may approximate the quote for my own purposes, it’s become my belief that if you love writing, you should want to build the content platform yourself.

With Newsstand, this is exactly the sort of creative thinking Apple is fostering.

Welcome back to our discussion on the iPad and digital publications. In our first article, we took a look at the current state of affairs and analyzed the difficulties the platform has faced in its first few years. In part two, I’ll be walking you through the advancements many publications have made using Newsstand as their backend. Keep reading to find out more about how the iPad is changing the publication industry.

(more…)

Since the introduction of the iPad in 2010, the state of digital publishing has gone through a lot of radical changes. Not unlike the shift towards “buy once and watch everywhere” in the movie industry, magazine publishers have had to account for the adjusted expectations of consumers.

The dust hasn’t settled from this big change yet, though, and this year it feels like things have really gotten a kickstart. There are a lot of ways publishers are handling this adjustment, and we’re going to outline a few of the responses over three feature articles here at iPad.AppStorm. In our first article, we’re taking a look at the basic principles of Newsstand and cross-platform pursuits like Zinio. So grab a cup of coffee and settle in: This is going to be good. (more…)

The biggest problem with Apple’s products is that they keep people within a walled garden. There’s a lot of benefits to the walled garden in some cases — namely security — but there can also be annoying detractions. One example is the DRM in the iBooks app that makes it altogether impossible to read anything you purchased on anything other than an iPad (I’d love it if Apple used .mobi instead so I could put anything I purchase from them on my Kindle).

But then there are some walls in Apple’s garden that nobody likes, like Newsstand. Newsstand is one of those apps that Apple let get away. Not only are most of the magazines in Newsstand difficult to search for in its Store (Apple really needs to merge the Newsstand with the iBooks Store), but they’re also merely digital scans of paper-based media with a few hyperlinks thrown in for good measure. Newsstand’s proprietary format and wooden shelves have driven a lot of people away from the app and towards its only clear, cross-platform alternative: Zinio. (more…)

The New York Times was one of the earliest iPad adopters. So early in fact, that they were able to show off their app alongside the device itself at it’s January 2010 introduction. Since then, the New York Times has continued to be an excellent example of print media adopting new and emerging digital platforms.

However, in early October, the New York Times did something a little different. They launched an “experimental” HTML5 web app for select subscribers that could very well replace the native offering in the App Store. Let’s take a look at the New York Times’ release and what it means for web apps as a platform. (more…)

So its Sunday, you’re snuggled up on the couch reading the weekend paper with a cup of coffee. Oh the crisp paper, the smell of ink, and the convenience of having the news delivered to your door. What if your tradition was flipped upside down? What if you could care less about the smell of ink? Well, PressReader might just be the app for you!

PressReader is a way to view newspapers from all over the world right in the palm of your hand, on your iPad. There are thousands of publications and you don’t end up with stacks of papers lying around waiting to thrown away (recycled, we hope!). So read on as I answer all of your most pressing questions…

(more…)

Newsstand is, basically, a way of organizing and making it easier to find magazine apps. Don’t think of it as a stand-alone app that will arrange all your stuff like iBooks does. In fact, Apple doesn’t even advertise it as an app, they call it a “folder”.

What’s most interesting about this folder is its integration with the “Newsstand” section of the App Store. Along with the introduction of this new folder in iOS 5, Apple also opened up a new section on the App Store that is dedicated just to magazines and newspapers, and in which you can get any free magazine app (as long as it’s available) in just a matter of seconds. But how does it work, and how important is it? Let’s see!

(more…)

theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow