Posts Tagged

PDF

One of the reasons I own a full-sized iPad is because it’s closer to the size of an 8.5“x11” sheet of paper. That has a lot of advantages: photos blown up to that size won’t look as clear as they will on an iPad mini with Retina display (not just because of the pixel density, although that does play a role, but largely thanks to the physical size of the screen), but they will appear closer to how they’d look if they were printed. That’s one huge improvement for me, particularly with clients.

But the other big reason for me to go for a full-sized iPad was so I could view PDFs. I use my iPad to keep my business as paper-free as possible. Although clients are often passing me paper to work on and I work with print layouts all the time, there are other times when the iPad has revolutionized the way I handle PDFs. This is largely thanks to apps liked PDF Expert 5, the successor to my most-used PDF app that came out recently. Read on to find out why it’s a must-have for both new users and upgrades.

(more…)

It’s Productivity Month on iPad.AppStorm! Throughout July, we plan to share with you all our tips, tricks, apps and resources to help you both improve your iPad experience and work better and more productively!

Let’s be honest: The iPad screen is almost perfect for PDFs. So why doesn’t the iPad handle them better? It’s not like it’s a terrible experience, but I’ve never once thought to myself that I’d love to sit down on my iPad and just go through some PDFs. I like to read screenplays sometimes, and they’re primarily available in PDF format. Reading them on my iPad, however, leaves something to be desired.

iBooks makes for an okay PDF reader, but it’s got a lot of missing functionality, for example, you can’t fill in a PDF form with iBooks. Recently, I bit the bullet and gave Readdle’s PDF Expert a try. I think it’s the best PDF app available, but there’s still plenty of room for improvement. Check out my detailed thoughts after the break.

(more…)

One of the things that has irritated me about iOS ever since its inception on the iPad back in 2010 is Apple’s seemingly lacking support for PDF files. Sure, you can open and read them from, say, an e-mail message, but without the use of third-party software, there’s absolutely no way to store them locally or edit them. This bugs me quite a lot: Preview in OS X is actually a pretty powerful program and I find myself using it on a daily basis to annotate PDFs and it even has iCloud support, so why haven’t Apple brought out a version of Preview for iOS yet? There was no mention of it in the grandiose WWDC announcement a couple of weeks back and nothing has been spotted in the developer previews as of yet, but time is the best healer and we may see something amalgamate come September-time.

Until then, iPad owners have to rely on third-party software to read and annotate PDFs, of which there is a great number — go to the App Store and type in the search box, “PDF” and you’ll see what I mean (by my last count, the search returned 2,035 results). And PDF Max Pro, by developers Mobeera is one of those. At an RRP of $9.99 (though it’s currently running a 50% off promotion) it is certainly one of the pricier offers, so let’s dive straight in and find out whether it is the go-to PDF reader for your iPad.

(more…)

The competition has now closed — congratulations to our winners, @marcoutsider, @CharlesTreece, @prudyleaf, @Speed2024 and @MT36000!

This week’s weekly sponsor is PDF Max Pro, an advanced PDF reader with support for annotations, note-taking and form-filling.

I personally am not a fan of the default PDF reader on the iPad, Preview, as it’s simply a very watered down version of the Mac version, with almost every single useful feature stripped out. There’s no support for annotations and all you can do is read PDFs in it – there’s no iCloud sync (like in iWork on iOS) with your Mac and, unless you succumb to iBooks, you can’t store PDFs natively on your iPad. Hence, most iPad users turn to third-party PDF readers which provide far more features, often at a tiny price.

Read on to find out how to win 1 of 5 free promotional codes for PDF Max Pro!

(more…)

CloudOn is a revolutionary way of working with fully-featured applications without having to install anything except for a small viewer app on your iPad. It works by using a virtual working environment — a Workspace — which links to one of several cloud-based storage providers, so none of your personal work is stored anywhere on CloudOn‘s infrastructure. You get to use your favourite cloud storage provider with all of their security protection, backup provision and so on whilst still working with industry-standard Microsoft Office 2010 and Adobe Reader, and all that right on your iPad.

That’s a pretty decent offering for a free application. Let’s take a closer look to see if it’s usable and practical working with this solution on the iPad’s tablet environment.

(more…)

There are plenty of reasons why you might want to take a screen capture of a website. While saving them as a JPEG or in a Word document is easy, nothing classes up the presentation quite like transforming an image into a PDF.

URL2PDF is the app that does that tricky task for you. Just copy and paste links and convert them into PDF files that can be shared via email or opened in programs such as Dropbox, iBooks and Google Drive.

Can URL2PDF be your new method for immortalizing Web content? Find out after the jump. (more…)

Reading documents on the iPad is a pleasure: the intuitivity and portability of it make it a classy and entertaining task. But sometimes it can get messy when you don’t have support for certain file formats, or when you’re not sure where your documents are being stored.

Today we are going to review an app called ReaddleDocs that could very well be your default go-to application to store and organize all of your files; whether they are PDF books, photos, videos or any other type of office application document. Let’s take a look!

(more…)

The first time I ever signed my name digitally was on a UPS deliverer’s handheld computer, and it seemed amazing that it would actually work. Years later, we sign our names on strips of plastic on credit card scanners in stores all the time, and it somehow doesn’t seem so magical any more.

Then, tax season comes, and we have to print out forms, sign them, scan them, find where the scanner decided to save them on the computer, and finally email them back to the accountant.

Wait, what? Surely with all the advances in computers, we should be able to file anything we need without resorting to a paper copy. Your iPad is the perfect device to make your computing more paper-free than ever. Keep reading to see how you can fill out PDF forms, markup and annotate documents, sign any document, and then send them anywhere you need all from an iPad.

(more…)

theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow