Posts Tagged

rss

I’ve written a couple times about how much I rely on my RSS feed. After the demise of Google Reader, I switched to Feed Wrangler and didn’t look back. The service is fast and consistently reliable, and I love that its open API integrates with a ton of other apps for iOS.

I’m always on the look for new RSS experiences. Turbine Reader offers exactly that: it’s designed from the ground up for iOS 7, tries to put a focus on content, and integrates with Feed Wrangler and NewsBlur (with the developer promising to work with more services soon). But is it worth displacing your favourite RSS app from your home screen? Read on to find out.

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The original Reeder was widely regarded as the best feed reader on the iPad, something we wholeheartedly agreed with in our Reeder for iPad review. Unfortunately, Google Reader was shut down earlier this year which not only forced its users to find a replacement platform but also had developers scrambling to update their apps.

Silvio Rizzi, the developer of Reeder, wanted to ensure that any update to one of the most popular RSS apps wasn’t just a rushed job, taking the decision to pull the iPad version from the App Store until an all-new app was ready with support for multiple services. Whilst Reeder for iPhone gained some support for other services, Reeder for iPad required a complete rewrite, something that would wait until the next version.

Well, Reeder is back in the App Store with an all-new app for both iPad and iPhone. Does absence really make the heart grow fonder or has Reeder been gone too long?

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Back in the days where MySpace was the king of social networks, Digg was the news aggregator sites. But competition from sites such as Reddit began to draw users away from Digg and their disastrous re-launch in 2008, known as Digg v4, would be their undoing.

But since then, Digg has undergone somewhat of a renaissance under the watchful eye of Betaworks and has completely changed and, whilst its core values remain unchanged, this is not the same service we’ve used before. Add to that their brand-new RSS service that was released shortly after Google discontinued their Reader platform and you have the makings of a truly remarkable content aggregator.

As Digg now offers two services, content curation and RSS, we put Digg for iPad through its paces to see if it can truly be a one-stop source for all your news and content consumption.

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I love options. With access to the App Store with over 375,000 apps available, you’ll have plenty of them — and the category of news readers is no exception. The fairly new on the scene app, Thirst, claims to be “a personalized newspaper that really matters to you.” But I’ve heard similar promises from other apps and been disappointed.

My biggest question going into this review was, “Is this news reader really going to be that different in order to make it stand out?” So, in a cluttered category how does Thirst stack up? Read on to find out.

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I’m on a lot of social networks, partially because I do a lot of work in the tech industry, and partially because I use my work in the tech industry as an excuse to be on a lot of social networks. When it comes down to it, though, I’m on the networks for two reasons. The first is so I can keep up with my friends and be jealous of their lives — especially thanks to Instagram, where I can see my one friend had a pulled pork sandwich for lunch at one of my favourite restaurants while I had peanut butter on toast and a banana. The other real reason I’m on social networks, at this point, is to keep up with the news.

Twitter and App.net are good at both, but both can be difficult to keep up with. That’s why I was really interested to see App.news, an aggregator of the links being shared on App.net. It skips all the chatter and just puts together a feed of articles — think of it as a sort-of RSS Reader for App.net. Is it worth your time? Read on to find out.

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I love reading the news on my iPad, especially because its big screen is very convenient to have a quick glance at the headlines and read them when seating comfortably. While there are a bunch of great news aggregators and RSS readers on the App Store, I wanted an app with a simple interface, great features and, most importantly, one that could sync with Google Reader — or a replacement service. Newsify was exactly what I was looking for: a clean interface, superloaded features and synchronization with Google Reader, which the developers will soon replace with Feedly.
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RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is a great way for people to stay up to date on the latest updates from their favorite websites. Google Reader has become one of the most popular RSS services available since it is free and easy to set up. Whilst Twitter might have replaced RSS for some users, I find value in knowing that there are certain websites that enable me to not miss any important updates. A quick search of the App Store leads to many app results for RSS apps that utilize Google Reader, including options such as Reeder, Mr. Reader, and Pulse but buried beneath the search results is a nice addition called Ziner.

Ziner’s tagline is “Where the simplicity of RSS returns.” Just one look at the screenshots and it can be hard to argue with that claim. Content is presented in a clean magazine format that can help remove the stress of the unread count. This raises a question which is: do consumers want simplicity with their RSS or would they prefer powerful callback features much like in Mr. Reader? One look at the new Mr. Reader update and the excellent review put together by Viticci makes a valid claim for more powerful RSS. Can simple still win in the RSS competition? Let’s dive in and take a look at Ziner to find out.

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I love RSS Feeds. They’re a little more focused than Twitter, and I love the way they encourage long-form article reading. At iPad.AppStorm, we frequently cite Reeder as one of those must-have iPad apps for people who have just purchased their wonderful new tablet, but we’ve never once posted our thoughts on what makes the app so great. Today, we rectify that.

Reeder, by Silvio Rizzi, is one of those rare apps that seemed to birth an entire genre. I use it on my iPhone, iPad and Macs, and despite the constantly growing and changing competition, I have yet to encounter a single RSS Reader that I like more. (more…)

Things change. People change. Times change.

We used to wind clocks and listen to the wireless, now we share what we had for lunch with hundreds of strangers and listen to music on our phones. My question to you this week is: how do you follow your favourite sites?

Once upon a time people actually had to visit sites they liked, but over the last decade a myriad of other means have grown up. Are you still a huge fan of RSS (I am), or do you simply follow every site you like on Twitter and look out for things that interest you?

Are you someone who loves the styling of G+ and would prefer to simply have your favourite content pop up in your stream?

Let me know in the comments if there’s a big way I’ve missed here, I’d be fascinated to hear!

The most popular RSS feed aggregator has become Google Reader. With the release of the App Store, Google Reader clients have started to become a common sight. There are a few popular ones that stick out including Reeder, NetNewsWire, and Mr. Reader.
While all of these are very good clients, they have a lot similarities. Most clients, such as Mr. Reader and NetNewsWire, take the approach of putting your feeds in a vertical scrolling list. Most also feature a feed column that allows the user to group items by feeds. But where is the innovation?

Reader X is the first (in a while) RSS client that takes a new approach to consuming RSS feeds. Instead of seeing feeds vertically they are placed in a horizontal list. Items are color coded based upon age and scrolling is fluid. Read on if a new take on RSS consumption seems interesting to you.

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