Posts Tagged

ted

I don’t have a cable subscription. I keep up with my television exclusively with Netflix, and since Netflix doesn’t offer as much TV in Canada as it could (or maybe should), I also use my Apple TV to watch shows I love as new episodes arrive (here’s looking at you, Mad Men). I don’t have time to watch a lot of Youtube. I know, I’m missing out on a lot of memes and I must lead a very boring life. But I love TED.

For those of you who haven’t heard of it, TED is an incredible free service that filled to the brim with informative videos from special TED conferences — sometimes motivational, sometimes de-motivational, and often about science or psychology. The TED conferences are all over the place, and if you aren’t able to attend, TED makes them available for free on the Web and in a great free universal app for iPhone and iPad. When I have fifteen minutes and I want to watch something, I often watch TED videos, and very usually fill my rare days off with them. The app is a great way to experience these videos, but is it perfect? Read on to find out how TED’s service could get even better after its recent update to iOS 7.

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When Tony Blair was re-elected back in 10 Downing Street on 7 June 2001 after a landslide victory for his Labour party, his first speech at the University of Southampton reiterated his top priority, “education, education, education”. In short, his speech highlighted his party’s commitment to investment and reform in Britain’s lagging education sector, which had suffered under the “neglect” of the Conservative Party. His speech, I believe, rekindled the public interest in education — and also became one of his most memorable soundbites. Although I don’t support the Labour Party or their principles, I do credit Mr Blair for awakening the dormant giant that is education — and it shows nowadays.

Almost every major technology company has a page of their corporate website dedicated to education, touting how their products will “change lives” and “enhance basic classroom activities”. Microsoft‘s, for example, demonstrates a variety of its products, such as Microsoft Office 365 and Windows 8, whereas Apple opts for a more device-orientated page, touting how its products such as the iPad and Mac allow pupils to “tap into their potential” and have “inspired learners”. OK, so it’s a bit cringeworthy, but you get the point.

And now, there’s a new area to focus on: educational videos. Sure, we’ve all heard of the likes of TED and the Khan Academy — both of which offer excellent material — but now, there’s a new kid on the block that wants to give these two a run for their money. Mobento describes itself as a “video learning platform” which not only has an outstanding database of videos for your viewing enjoyment but it also allows you to search within videos for the actual words spoken. To help me understand a bit more about this amazing product, I spoke to Sumner Murphy, the founder of Mobento — here’s what he (and myself) had to say.

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Apple’s iPad TV ads are gloriously seductive. They ooze minimalism and simplicity while simultaneously urging you to find this great new device a place in your life…

To have your app selected to be part of Apple’s official iPad marketing campaign, to be showcased on the actual television over that effervescent piano jam, must mark a goal for almost every iOS developer. The only further step that exists would be to have your app showcased on stage at a launch event!

The apps in the ads are often chosen for their beautifully interfaces and intriguing concepts, you don’t see third-party Twitter clients. Today I’ll take a quick look at some of the more recent apps that have featured and what makes them special – it’s going to be tempting!

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TED is the Technology, Entertainment and Design set of conferences that covers various topics and consists of many addresses by powerful, and interesting, persons including the likes of Bill Clinton, Larry Page, Will Wright and Jamie Oliver.

TED was founded as a one-off event in 1984 and then as an annual event from 1990 – but costly and invitation-only. Some sixteen years later, it became an online service with talks available for free via a dedicated website, iTunes and, in late 2009, an iOS application. In the talks themselves, speakers are given a maximum of 18 minutes to present their ideas in engaging ways.

TED‘s dedicated iPad application joined the iPhone app to deliver the same videos available through TED.com on a familiar media consumption platform, the iPad. Unlike a web application or something generic like the YouTube app, the official TED application offers an experience that’s tailored to its content and the conference itself.

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