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Hipmunk is a young start-up specializing in the travel industry. The company launched in 2010 and has been concentrating on building Web and Mobile applications to help its users find and book flights and hotels. Hipmunk offers a pretty solid web platform, but also applications for iOS and Android.

The start-up has recently raised $15 million in a series B round of funding, which rises its total amount of funding to $20 million. Its CEO, Adam Goldstein, wants to focus the company efforts on building tools and products related to the travel industry.

Hipmunk is free to use. The company makes money once you book a flight or a night in a hotel. In this post, we’ll go through a deep review of Hipmunk for the iPad and learn how to use it. (more…)

Grockit, which calls itself the social learning company, specializes in collaborative online test preparation for those studying to take the GMAT, GRE, LSAT, SAT, ACT and other university-related exams. But now the company is expanding its vision with Learnist, an app designed to let anyone learn more about, well, pretty much anything. Think of it as the Pinterest for education.

Or for informative multimedia, at the very least, which you can curate on any subject, and also share with others. Click “more” to see what it’s all about. (more…)

The iPad currently has three major social networking apps available on it: Facebook, Twitter and Google+, the last of which is rarely used. Most people use Facebook so they use that app, but there are some who still enjoy Twitter’s much declined (it now looks like a large version of the iPhone edition) official app. Then there are the rare few who prefer Google’s solution to online social networking.

But one service has not been mentioned because it was originally exclusive to the iPhone. This micro social network, as some would call it, is Path. It’s been around since March 2011 and, while it received a lot of praise at first, was recently criticized for an issue found in many iOS apps (accessing contacts without the user’s approval). An independent developer released a Mac app named Journey that allowed users to browse their Path news feeds, but other than that, an iPad app has been needed for some time. It finally released on November 1, but can it match the greatness of the iPhone app? (more…)

Reading has become part of nearly every person’s life. Even if it’s just a quick glimpse at a sign when you’re walking through town or traveling about, you read things at least once a day. You were probably taught the alphabet and how to read a book when you were just a child, as most people were. Now, you’ve advanced to long novels like The Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones, among others. The only thing that’s changed about reading lately is the medium.

Before the release of e-readers and the iPad, people read tactile material, not PDFs or ePubs of their favorite books. Electronic books have become very popular lately, however. On an iOS device, there are a lot of ways to read books, but the two most popular are Amazon’s Kindle app and Apple’s iBooks. They both offer a good selection of the classics and New York Times bestsellers, but in all of iBooks’ existence, we at iPhone.AppStorm haven’t taken a deep look at the app. With its latest update, now is as good a time as ever. (more…)

A month or so ago, Pose launched its native app made specifically for the iPad. Pose has iPhone and Android native apps as well; the iPhone app was already reviewed at iPhone.AppStorm.

Pose is a photo sharing app for outfits. Users take a snapshot of their outfit and tag it with brand and designer details. You can also discover other people poses and even shop from within the app. Pose has a considerable users’ adoption; more than 10 thousands poses are being added to the platform everyday. (more…)

My mother always comes up with these get-rich quick ideas whenever I’m looking for new work. Early last summer, when I found myself in such a predicament, she came up to me with this “great business model” she’d been speaking to somebody on the phone about: a distribution model in which I, as a third-party vendor of sorts, contact doctors’ offices and laundromats and other such businesses and sell them advertising-heavy magazines at “discounted” rates. I get to keep a big portion of the cut, pay for some of the print cost for smaller, local publications, and get to tour the city a lot looking for crummy joints who might be interested in my sales pitch.

I told her that there was no way I’d get involved in that — as far as I was concerned, people were all reading the news on their smartphones and tablets. And I was certain that magazines would become digitally replaced as soon as somebody figured out the best way to format a magazine for such devices. I told her I was tempted to get in on it and make a curated news app myself, just so I could prove to her that the market for paper magazines was seriously diminishing by comparison.

Well, Marco Arment beat me to it and his newest app, fittingly (and maybe a little egotistically) named The Magazine, has blown me away. (more…)

Everyday, roughly 42 percent of tablet owners in the U.S. use their device while watching TV. Why? TV viewers are multitasking (i.e. web browsing) or using their device as a second screen in order to find more information about the program they’re watching or engage in social networking banter.

With this rise of second screen usage, it should come as no surprise that app makers want to provide tools that act as a companion to a user’s TV. Instead of jumping on Twitter to comment about a show, IMDb to access a show’s cast or Shazam to tag a song that’s being performed, IntoNow from Yahoo! hopes to provide all those functions and more. But, does it do so effectively? (more…)

When I’ve got a car trip or other prolonged activity coming up, I always make sure the latest episodes of The Pen Addict and MacBreak Weekly, my two favorite podcasts, are downloaded and ready for listening. I’ll even do some exploring on occasion in a desperate attempt to find something different than music to listen to (I overplay my whole library and listen to music in general far too often). With iOS 5 and prior, all of this used to be easy, but now things have changed.

In iOS 6, Apple decided it was time to remove the podcasts function of the Music app and replace it with a standalone app, available for free in the App Store. Properly titled Podcasts, this app released in June of this year, but has been under much criticism for its half-baked design, lag and lack of functionality. Since then, there have been three updates to the app, the last of which arriving the day of iOS 6’s release. All the same, is this app even worth the trouble Apple has gone to thus far? (more…)

Do you lie awake at night worrying you’ll miss the next episode of NCIS? Do you feel lost if your other friends know the latest news about The Big Bang Theory before you? Are you sick of constantly scrolling through hours of the programming grid just to find out when Breaking Bad will air a new episode?

Ok, so maybe I’m exaggerating a little, or maybe you really do need counseling to break your TV addiction. Either way, TV Guide Mobile is the app that brings the famous website to the iPad and scratches your television itch. Read on to learn all it has to offer.

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I’m normally not one to use the word “finally” in a headline. Unlike some, I tend to forego snarky comments when a feature has been added to an OS or hardware device that others think should have been added long before (a typical occurrence with the annual iOS and iPhone updates). However, as a Netflix user since 2009, I’ve always been displeased with the method provided to manage my Instant Queue.

It’s true that Movies by Flixster does offer the ability to sort your queue; personally, though, I’d much rather use a single tool to manage my entire Netflix account, queue and all. Luckily, I’ve finally found that tool in the form of CineTap. (more…)

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