Weathertron: Personalized Weather Infographics on Your iPad

I’m always looking for a better weather app — something that gives me the best information in the most attractive interface. Weathertron is one of the slickest weather apps I’ve seen, creating personalized weather infographics every day.

While looks are always nice, what really matters in a weather app is quality of information and whether you can find what you need when you need it. I’ll take a look at Weathertron and find out if it’s more than just a pretty face.

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Don’t Rain on My Parade

Tell Weathertron where you are or let it find your location to get started, but after that, Weathertron is pretty much good to go. Once the app knows where you are, it’s ready to give you a great looking and informative graphic that let’s you know all about your weather. There’s more information here than you might expect, and it’s a simple thing to get at all of your weather details.

Your current conditions, including temp and expected rainfall are easy to find.

Your current conditions, including temp and expected rainfall are easy to find.

Take a peek up top to see your current conditions. Weathertron gives you an icon to represent the current weather, like a sun if everything’s clear or a big, angry cloud if it’s storming outside. There’s also a brief text description of weather conditions, and off to the right, you’ll see the current temp. Tap this top bar to see the dawn and dusk times for your area.

The bottom of the Weathertron graphic is given over to a line graph that plots your high and low temperatures for the day over time. Slide your finger back and forth across the graph to check what the temperature will be later in the day, and you’ll see it appear in the top conditions display. To get back to your current temp and conditions, tap the pulsing orange marker.

Above the temperature graph, you’ll find a blue bar graph that plots precipitation. If you’re not expecting any rain, the graph will be clear, but if you’re looking at a deluge on the horizon, you’ll see pale blue bars denoting light, moderate, and heavy rainfall. Again, this is plotted over time, so slide your finger back and forth across the graph to gaze into your own weather future. The light blue to white bands just above the precipitation graph denote cloud cover; the whiter the band, the thicker the clouds.

It's probably going to rain a bit tomorrow, and I can look forward to some clouds.

It’s probably going to rain a bit tomorrow, and I can look forward to some clouds.

Let’s face it, there are weather apps that give you more information than Weathertron. If you’re going to use Weathertron, it’s going to be for the good looks, and the developer seemed to realize that. When you share your weather with Weathertron, it doesn’t just post to Facebook and Twitter your temperature and whether it’s raining or not. Instead, it sends off a static image of your Weathertron infographic. Your weather’s going to look pretty fancy with very little effort on your part, and if something big is happening, Weathertron’s images are a great way to convey a lot of information easily.

Let’s See the Map in Motion

No weather forecast is complete unless you know what’s coming up, and Weathertron gives you the same peek at the next day’s weather. Tap Tomorrow to get a similar infographic. This one works the same as today’s weather, missing only the current conditions, but you can get a jump on what to expect.

The forecast for the next seven days isn't as detailed, but you'll have a good idea of what to expect.

The forecast for the next seven days isn’t as detailed, but you’ll have a good idea of what to expect.

The icon in the bottom right will get you the forecast for the next seven days. While nothing here will be as detailed as the main view, you’ll see your high and low temps and get an idea of whether you should keep your umbrella close at hand. There’s also a short text summary of any big swings in your weather; if a cold front is moving in or there will be a break in the clouds, it’s called out here.

Make It Yours

It’s worth talking about the settings, because there’s some good stuff here. You can switch back and forth from Fahrenheit to Celsius, which should go without saying, but I’ve seen that missing from some slick weather apps. If you prefer a 24-hour clock, you can change over to that, too.

Set your options so Weathertron works just how you want.

Set your options so Weathertron works just how you want.

The real bummer in Weathertron is that it can only hold one location in its little brain at a time. That means, if you want to check the weather at your home and at your office an hour away, you’ll have to do a separate search each time. Weathertron doesn’t have a mechanism to save those locations. You will find just about every city in the world in Weathertron’s search, though, which is pretty cool, again, something I’ve found limiting in other weather apps.

Final Thoughts

I like Weathertron a lot. I think it’s a really pretty way to get a lot of information in a way that makes a lot of sense. While everything in the Weathertron iPad app is also available in the identical iPhone app, I can’t say I mind looking at Weathertron on a much larger screen. All of the information here is clear and concise, and that’s important if I just need to know whether to wear a coat or shorts today.

I wish I could track more than one location, though. That’s where Weathertron really falls down for me. It sure does make up for it with a pretty interface, but I’m not sure that’s enough when I really need to check the weather in a couple of different cities every day. If you like to share your weather with friends, though, especially when things get extreme, Weathertron’s infographics are a nice way to go.


Summary

A beautiful weather app with easy graph sharing, but no saved locations.

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